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Sex and Male Health – Is There a Link?

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Next to “Doc, am I going to die?” the most common questions men seem to have are about sex and health. Well, gentlemen, I have good news. Because the research seems to say, “Sex is good for you.”

Read on to discover why you should probably have more romantic evenings in your life…

Sex and Your Prostate

Few organs are more closely tied to your sex life than your prostate. It produces fluids that are a part of your semen. And when your prostate “goes south,” your sex life usually follows in short order.

But here’s the good news: Frequent sex appears to be good for your prostate.

Australian researchers compared the sexual histories of men with and without serious prostate trouble. Frequent ejaculation was linked to a lower risk of prostate trouble. The difference was especially clear for men who ejaculated five or more times per week in their 20’s.1

And this study wasn’t conducted by fringe whackos, either. These professionals were from such respected institutions as the University of Melbourne and the European Institute of Oncology.

And they’re not alone, either. A 2004 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association echoes their findings.

In this study of 29,342 men, researchers discovered a clear connection between frequent sex and prostate health. Men who ejaculated 21 times or more per month – regardless of age – had a much lower risk of serious prostate trouble.2

In fact, their risk was cut by as much as a third. And the difference was even more pronounced for men who’d ejaculated frequently during the previous year.

And, believe it or not, the news only gets better…

Can Sex Protect Your Heart?

The answer, according to a British study, is “Yes!”

Researchers at the University of Bristol analyzed the results of a study of Welsh men. What they found was terrific news for guys.

Not only does sexual activity not increase the risk of heart trouble… sex lowers it! They found no causal link between sex and serious heart issues. But they did find an advantage. In fact, after 10 years, men who had the least sex were 2.8 times more likely to die from heart problems than men who had the most frequent sex.3

And if you think you’re feeling better about your sex drive now, I have one more piece of good news for you.

The Pleasurable Way to Live Longer

Less prostate trouble… less heart trouble… It seems like sex is more than just physical pleasure. And an analysis of the Welsh study I mentioned backs that up – in spades.

In a report titled “Sex and Death: Are They Related?” the Bristol researchers answered their own question. And, again, the answer was “Yes!”

In fact, they discovered that men who had the most frequent sex cut their risk of death from all causes by 50%!4

That’s right. Enjoying themselves frequently cut their risk of death in half!

To me, the results are pretty clear. More frequent sex appears to be good for your prostate… for your heart… and for your overall health.

Of course, there’s one benefit none of these studies mention. And that’s the increased intimacy you can enjoy with your partner. One of the greatest benefits of frequent sex is that it can bring two people that much closer together.

Stay healthy!

Dr. Kenneth Woliner, M.D.
Best Life Herbals

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1 Parks CG, et al. Telomere length, current perceived stress, and urinary stress hormones in women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 Feb;18(2):551-60. Epub 2009 Feb 3.
2 Benetos A, et al. Short Telomeres Are Associated With Increased Carotid Atherosclerosis in Hypertensive Subjects. Hypertension. 2004;43:182.
3 Huzen J, et al. The emerging role of telomere biology in cardiovascular disease. Front Biosci. 2010 Jan 1;15:35-45.
4 von Zglinicki T. Oxidative stress shortens telomeres. Trends Biochem Sci. 2002 Jul;27(7):339-44.
5 Qun Xu, et al. Multivitamin use and telomere length in women1,2,3. Am J Clin Nutr (March 11, 2009). doi:10.3945/ajcn.2008.26986
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