Contact Us: contact@bestlife-herbals.com
1-866-405-5138 (U.S.) • 1-925-331-6892 (Non-U.S.)

Head hurt? Don’t reach for the pills yet

Share this:

Easy Ways to Stop the Throbbing in Your Head

An aching head is one of the world’s most common health complaints. Almost everyone’s headaches at some time… and millions of people suffer on a regular basis. But many people don’t recognize some of the most common causes… or the simple ways to get rid of that throbbing in your head.

Today, I’ll let you in on a few secrets about aching heads.

One of the most common causes strikes on the weekend. After a long week, millions of people try to catch up on their sleep. But when they wake up, their head is pounding. Many of them blame it on “too much sleep.”

But they’re really experiencing the effects of caffeine withdrawal.

An achy head is one of the most common signs of caffeine withdrawal. And studies show that even people who drink fairly little coffee can suffer.1 Getting up a little earlier on the weekends – and drinking your morning cup of coffee – will help clear this problem right up.

Mild-to-severe head pain is a classic sign of a hangover, too. You may have even heard about drinking a large glass of water after overdoing it. The water helps hold off the throbbing head of a classic hangover.

That’s because alcohol tends to dehydrate you. And it’s the dehydration – not the alcohol itself – that causes your head to hurt.

Studies only confirmed that dehydration can lead to an aching head in the last few years. But it’s a remarkably common problem. And it can be remarkably easy to relieve. Two-thirds of the people in one study got rid of the aching in their heads within a half-hour just by drinking – on average – a pint or so of water.2

Fasting is another common trigger for an aching head. During religious holidays many people who fast suffer, though the exact cause isn’t known. Caffeine withdrawal and low blood sugar have been suggested.

Whatever the trigger… if you try one of those “quick-start” fasting diets, there’s a chance you’ll find your head pounding.

Of course, stress and tension also get your head pounding. And if that’s what’s happening to you, I have good news. You still may not have to reach for a bottle of pills.

White willow bark tea will often do the trick. Willow bark has been used safely for nearly 2,500 years. Even today, it’s a popular home remedy. And it’s the only herb Germany’s famous Commission E recognizes for an aching head.

If you get frequent headaches, acupuncture may bring relief. In two large trials – lasting 3 months each – acupuncture promoted fewer and less severe episodes of head pain.3

If needles make you nervous, you can try acupressure. Taiwanese doctors discovered most people felt 6 months of relief after just one month of acupressure sessions.4

If you suffer with frequent, blinding aches, co-enzyme Q10 – CoQ10 for short – may help. Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University started a group of sufferers on 150 mg of CoQ10 a day. After just 3 months, 61.3% reported less than half as many days with an aching head as before.5

Most often, the throbbing in your head has a simple cause. And there’s usually a simple way to get relief. Sometimes, it can be as easy as drinking a glass of water.

Stay Healthy,

Dr Kenneth Woliner, M.D.
Best Life Herbals

1 Silverman K, et al. Withdrawal Syndrome After The Double-Blind Cessation Of Caffeine Consumption. The New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 327 OCTOBER 15, 1992 Number 16.

2 Blau JN, et al. Water-Deprivation Headache: A New Headache With Two Variants. Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain, Volume 44, Issue 1, pages 79–83, January 2004.

3 Linde K, et al. Acupuncture for tension-type headache. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009 Jan 21;(1):CD007587.

4 Hsieh LL, et al. Effect of Acupressure and Trigger Points in Treating Headache: A Randomized Controlled Trial. The American Journal of Chinese Medicine, Volume: 38, Issue: 1(2010) pp. 1-14.

5 Rozen TD, et al. Open label trial of coenzyme Q10 as a migraine preventive. Cephalalgia. 2002 Mar;22(2):137-41.

Share this:

Leave a Comment