New Research Suggests Certain Vitamins May Support Healthy Hearing

One of the most frustrating signs of aging is hearing loss. Conversations fade… quiet music starts to lose its beauty… and the everyday sounds you once took for granted move into the background. That’s why I’m happy to tell you the latest research says there’s hope. Certain vitamins may support healthy hearing.

The key is a natural compound call homocysteine.

Your body creates homocysteine (HCS) when it metabolizes proteins. It’s a natural process… and your body has a natural way to get rid of any excess HCS. But only if you get the right nutrients.

These days, many folks often opt for a burger and fries over a diet rich in veggies. And that creates a problem. Because it’s exactly the kind of diet that encourages high levels of HCS.

Multiple studies show that high HCS levels are linked to hearing loss.1 And a diet that favors red meat over veggies raises levels of HCS. (This will also boost your risk of heart problems.)

Fortunately, there’s an easy way to lower your levels of HCS. And that’s to get more B vitamins. Plus, studies in the last few years have suggested that some B vitamins may help defend against age-related hearing loss.2

In other words, if you get enough B vitamins, your world may stay sharper and clearer for years longer. And some studies have linked folate – vitamin B9 – levels with hearing.3

New research has put the focus on another B vitamin, though. It’s B3 – also known as niacin.

Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes gave a B3 precursor – a substance your body can make into B3 – to a group of mice. Some mice got their B3 before being exposed to loud noises. Others got their B3 afterwards.

But it didn’t seem to make a difference. Either way, taking the B3 precursor reduced the damage from noise.4

B9 and B12 have gotten the most press. Mostly because they seem to lower HCS better than other B vitamins. But this new study seems to say we should watch the other B vitamins, too. Especially B3.

Lamb, peanuts, chicken, turkey, and salmon are all good sources of vitamin B3. But tuna is probably your best source. With over 150% of your daily requirement per serving, tuna beats other sources hands-down.

Of course, you may have concerns about mercury and over-fishing. So eating a serving of tuna every day probably isn’t at the top of your list. That’s just one reason I recommend taking a natural multi-vitamin and mineral supplement every day.

Your best bet may be getting complete nutrition from your food. But, in all honesty, most of us don’t. A multi-vitamin/mineral supplement can help ensure you get the nutrition you need to cover all your bases.

Including giving you a solid defense for your hearing. After all, who can put a price on those “everyday sounds”… until they begin to fade?

Yours in continued good health,
Best Life Herbals Wellness Team

Click here for Best Life Herbal’s Tympanol and Get the Nutrition You Need to Support the Best Hearing Possible.

1 Gok, U., et al, “Comparative analysis of serum homocysteine, folic acid and Vitamin B12 levels in patients with noise-induced hearing loss,” Auris Nasus Larynx. 2Mar 004 31(1): 19-22.

2 Lasisi, A.O., et al, “Age-related hearing loss, vitamin B12, and folate in the elderly,” Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. Dec 2010; 143(6): 826-830.

3 Gopinath, B., et al, “Serum homocysteine and folate concentrations are associated with prevalent age-related hearing loss,” J Nutr. Aug 2010; 140(8): 1469-1474.

4 “Vitamin Supplement Successfully Prevents Noise- Induced Hearing Loss,” Gladstone Institutes. Dec 2, 2014.

 

The statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. They are not intended to treat, diagnose, prevent or cure and disease.

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